Bluford Healthcare Leadership Institute Forums 2020 BHLI Cohort Engagement From Separate to Equal and The 1619 Project

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 47 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • Jihad_Miller
    Participant
    Post count: 2

    From Separate to Equal Response:
    A). While watching the From Separate to Equal documentary, I felt a sense of pride for my heritage and my people. Throughout the documentary, countless nurses, doctors, and just ordinary citizens during that time period detailed the challenges and obstacles our people had to go through to break the barrier of access to basic healthcare. Even Dr. Bluford himself described those challenges when remembering the clinic that he used to go to as child instead of being allowed to get help from the public hospital facility in his time. I felt pride because even though it seemed one obstacle was stacked on another, our people never gave up. When black doctors weren’t allowed to serve on the staff of General Hospital #2, we found a way to fight through it. When Dr. Jabez Jackson rejected our black doctors because he believed that they weren’t smart enough to perform surgery, we proved them and the others wrong. When General Hospital #2 lacked equipment, our nurses created their own bandages and saline solution. That grit and determination to never give up was passed from generation to generation through our ancestors.
    B). Dr. Jabez Jackson’s excerpt in the documentary was infuriating because of the lack of judgment he had. “I just don’t believe colored people can think that fast” is insulting and ignorant because as a racist he based the doctors not off their abilities but their skin color. The examinations the city used to proctor their physicians reminds me of how when blacks were fighting for the right to vote, they also had to take unfair examinations. Unsurprisingly most blacks failed why whites passed. However, when the exams for both instances were graded justly, many blacks had actually passed the exams.

    1619 Project Response:
    A) While I was reading the 1619 Project, I felt anger and embarrassment that our people had to go through such horrible events. I agree with Nikole Hannah-Jones that this country ideals is full of irony and hypocrisy. The colonists claimed they were slaves to the British but they kept slaves on their own. It angers me that the first several presidents of our nation such as George Washington and Thomas Jefferson had hundreds of our people in bondage; yet those men wanted to create a “free country.” In my opinion the Constitution and Declaration of Independence are based on lies by frauds. “All men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.” I don’t know what more ridiculousness, that our president actually wrote these words or that our whole country believed and idolized those words and him.
    B). I agree with the statement that the United States was built by African Americans because it actually was. Literally almost everything that is here was built by us. If we never stolen from Africa, America would not be the nation that it is today. If it wasn’t for Native Americans, the original colonists would not have survived the winter in 1619.

    Taylor_Hamilton
    Participant
    Post count: 4

    After reading the “1619 Project” I was saddened by many of the vivid stories that were included, it bothered me to think about all the things that blacks have gone through in America, and the fact that still in 2020 African Americans do still do not get the treatment or opportunities that we deserve. Through reading about many tragedies African Americans have had to go through it makes me feel more enlightened and motivated to continue to fight for change in the black community. It has become more important to me after reading the stories in the “1619 Project” to use my education and leadership skill to fight against the health disparities that minority Americans face still to this day. The language that was used was a bit surprising to me as I have never experienced blatant racism and hate towards people just based off the color of their skin. It saddens me that black Americans have had to go through such brutal treatment as if they have truly done wrong, but instead have been the foundation of building this country. It is obvious that many of these issues are at large still today and it is our job to continue to fight against the odds until we get the equality, treatment, and the opportunities that we deserve. Overall, I think that the “1619 Project” was a very important thing for people to be aware of and to consider in our everyday American life.

    Lauren_Dones
    Participant
    Post count: 3

    The 1619 Project Response

    After reading the 1619 Project I felt thankful that the New York Times took the initiative to expose and explain why African-Americans are the ones who should be credited with founding this nation. However, I also felt sad that there was so much that I was still unaware about, and if I am, then how can I expect those who are not a part of the black community to understand the extent to which discrimination is still abundant and masked by systems that are generations-old. The fact that most people will never be able to fully understand the realities of living in Black America is troubling, but this unique broadcasting gives me hope that through the help of mainstream media, one day all of America’s citizens will see their country for what it actually is. I found it profound just how much history has shown that people want to find reasons to make African-American people appear less than or different from everyone else. Thus, we are continuously punished for our existence out of a desire to prove to themselves that their lives have greater purpose and importance than anyone else’s. I think what plagues America is this lack of desire for true unity; the country is scared of relinquishing control and is scared of the power that could come from the different races fully accepting one another. Therefore, the unapologetic attitude of the storytelling is one of the things I loved most and it sets the precedent of what is expected for future platforms looking to give African Americans a place to share their stories. The magazine effectively showed just how every part of society is plagued by racism from the transit system in Atlanta to Healthcare and more.

    • This reply was modified 2 years, 4 months ago by Lauren_Dones.
    Lauren_Dones
    Participant
    Post count: 3

    From Seperate to Equal

    The overwhelming emotion I got from the “From Separate to Equal” was pride that this was another example of African Americans beating the odds against a system set up to make us fail, and gratitude for the people who had to persevere and fight their way to provide African Americans in Kansas City a space for healing. I also found myself excited for what was coming next as the film progressed and progress was being made, and I was even baffled sometimes as to the justification that was given for the discrimination in healthcare that was taking place. Hearing the testimonies of the people who made it all possible, whether it was through written text or from those closest to them, really added to the telling of the story for me. It was gratifying that their perspectives hadn’t been lost or buried, but that their stories were being deliberately included in order to appreciate all of the work that it took to dismantle segregation in the Kansas City Healthcare System. Watching the video, I wondered how far behind would healthcare be if not for those who pioneered establishing safe spaces for African Americans when they did. The video further proved to me that the lack of minority representation in hospital administration stalls equal opportunity for the best quality of healthcare. One nurse’s explanation of how having to work harder for what they had, ultimately trained them to be better caregivers, encompasses the general attitude of the film. The film is free from bitterness, and instead shows how proud the community is of the perseverance required of those who ultimately made the fully-integrated Truman Medical Center possible.

    Briana_Paris
    Participant
    Post count: 3

    Separate to Equal:
    This video was very enlightening, though sad and inspiring. As a Minnesota native whose family originated in Kansas City, it was extremely difficult, but heartening, to learn about how Drs. Unthank, Perry, and Thompson fought to change American medicine for African Americans and other minorities. Hearing their stories made me proud to be an African American pre-medical student. I am also extremely excited to start my journey in medicine as a dermatologist and public health official. One thing that spoke to me were Dr. Jabez North Jackson’s words explaining how he thought that colored men did not have the capacity to learn surgery. It baffled me that this man, a serving president of the American Medical Association, still believed African Americans were inferior to white Americans after his countless years of medical instruction. Almost 100 years later, nothing has changed; there are still doctors who believe we are intellectually and physically different that our white counterparts. His words and beliefs, that are still prevalent today, inspire me to continue to change how African Americans and other minorities are treated in medicine.

    The 1619 Project:
    This journal was extremely hard for me to read. I “knew” a lot of the things that were discussed, such as how slavery built Wall Street, and how racist American politicians were, but this journal went deep into America’s racist origin. Often while reading, I had to stop for a couple days because I would get so upset or mad at how America has treated us. I did enjoy how easily the writers connected core aspects of American society, such as capitalism and loopholes in laws, to slavery. I often question how states can “open up,” as Covid-19 destroys black and brown communities at an alarming rate compared to other communities, but the journal showed that what is currently happening the United States of America has been happening since the beginning.

    Martin_Searcy
    Participant
    Post count: 2

    1A) After reviewing the video “Separate to Equal” I felt a sense of pride in my culture and my people. From viewing how my ancestors in the past were able to persevere through the economic hardships in the medical community and seeing how they were able to make do with what they had, this made me feel very proud to know that I carry on this legacy of uplifting and providing healthcare to my community and the other communities around it. After viewing the video I also felt a bit of sorrow from seeing the tragedies and deaths that came from the black hospitals because they did not have the right resources, nor the funding to be successful. Lastly, I felt inspired and thankful because seeing these black doctors like Dr. Unthank and Dr. Perry fight for their own hospitals and their own rights to practice and overcoming their obstacles, this shows that they have opened many doors for me and my fellow African American colleagues. This inspires me to overcome any of my endeavors and be the best doctor I can be.
    1B) In the documentary the languages and attitudes that stood out to me were erudite, malignant, optimistic, and critical. The criticalness and maliciousness stood out to me because many times through history, there would be caucasian people trying to sabotage black people’s efforts to move forward and advance themselves. For example, this was shown when Dr. Jabez Jackson would not allow the African American doctors to serve on the staff at General #2 Hospital or when the tunnel was made between the two hospitals, taking resources from General Hospital #2. Eruditeness stood out to me because from watching the documentary, I was able to tell that these African American doctors were well educated and very intelligent men, nevertheless, they were still unable to have the opportunities of others because of the color of their skin. Lastly, optimism stood out because the black doctors and nurses were able to find a way to overcome their obstacles
    2A) After reading the magazine I felt a feeling of sadness, confusion, irritation, and frustration. I felt these because it was disheartening seeing these tragedies about my ancestors that have gone on in the past. It was sad to see how slavery is linked to many things in the world today. It was confusing to see the hypocrisy of the US in making laws for freedom and independence for everyone, except for people of color. Lastly, it was irritating and frustrating to learn more about how the US was made by black people in every way, and yet we still to this day have not been able to reap the benefits of our ancestor’s labor.
    2B) In this magazine the languages and attitudes that stood out to me were disingenuous and gloomy. The disingenuousness of the magazine stood out to me because the US was not sincere, did not care, and do not care to this day about African Americans. In addition, the gloom stood out because the tragedies were ultimately very sad and dark and the magazine highlighted how African Americans were and are rejected from society.

    Daniel_Searcy
    Participant
    Post count: 2

    From Separate to Equal

    A) The emotions I felt while watching the documentary were that of anger and frustration. It was hard for me to listen to the stories and see the pictures of the injustices committed against African Americans who just wanted to provide or receive healthcare. I felt proud that we as a community were able to achieve this dream and we were able to get the resources that we needed during a time when white people would actively deny us opportunities and support.
    B) The determination of Dr. Thomas Unthank stood out to me. He became the first African American to practice medicine in Kansas City, Missouri. He wanted to bring healthcare to the African American community. Even though his first attempt at creating a hospital was short lived, he was still determined to achieve his goal.

    The 1619 Project

    A) The emotions I felt after reading this were frustration and pride. I felt frustration because it wars hard to read about how African Americans were treated and what they had to go through every day. Its frustrating to see how hard life in the US was through multiple stories from people who experienced those hardships. I felt proud to be a part of a community with people who have such strength and it was inspiring to see that even though they had to experience slavery, segregation, racism, and the horrors that come with it, they were able to stay strong and get through it.
    B) The attitude in this magazine stood out to me the most. This magazine did a very good job at showing the horrors of slavery with its descriptions. The detailed descriptions of African Americans being burned, dismembered, and being the victims of other violent acts stuck with me. The magazine seemed very sad because of the gruesome reality of slavery and the horrifying acts that have been done to African Americans.

    Sharmelle_Winsett
    Participant
    Post count: 1

    I have really enjoyed reading your responses thus far. Having well rounded historical view of this country has been important in helping me understand that the solutions for equitable healthcare is multi-layered. As BHLI scholars, you will have the opportunity to think critically about what solutions and policies can be put in place today to change the negative impacts of healthcare disparities in minority and vulnerable communities tomorrow. Thank you for sharing your thoughts and feelings about the assignments. I look forward to hearing from the rest of the group!

    Douglas_Burnett
    Participant
    Post count: 3

    From Separate to Equal Video Response

    I would be remiss if I did not commend this organization for selecting two impactful sources, via video and text, to impose much needed knowledge and competence for my peers and I.

    It is inexpressibly hard to depict my true reaction and emotions to this amazing documentary, due to the fact that an abundance of thoughts and emotions flood my mind when I draw myself to ponder on content. Being that no one has the true time to read what could be nearly pages long; I will attempt to succinctly depict my true reaction and emotions in a paragraph or more. To start, I must say assert that I was quite motivated and encouraged by my ancestors and their tireless efforts to create equity within a health care system that was not tailored to suit their true needs. Until now, I was never quite aware of the depth of African-Americans involvement within the healthcare industry of Kansas City, Missouri. What momentous pride I felt as I witnessed renowned physicians like, Dr. Edward Perry who defied odds like never before and transcended to gain admittance into Chicago School of Medicine. Although he was faced with opposition every day while learning, he remained steadfast and never lost sight of his goal. This reminded me of the wise saying, “you can achieve whatever you put your mind to”, Dr. Perry was a living testament to this. As an African-American male, I am faced with constant opposition on a daily basis, but I will be mindful to remind myself of the testament Dr. Perry embodied to encourage myself.

    It is my earnest desire, especially in times like now, that Blacks mobilize and fight with a zealous heart to ensure the system of America that was not created for us to dwell equally in, and ensure that it does. The encouraging testaments of our ancestors should be utilized as a guide to trail blaze the path they placed before us. I am immensely proud that Mr. Bluford is a Black man who is using his keen ability to educate young Black students like myself and my fellow peers of the Bluford Healthcare Leadership Institute, both past and present, on how to be zealous advocates for our people as they are faced with horrid healthcare disparities. I am forever grateful for this opportunity.

    Douglas_Burnett
    Participant
    Post count: 3

    The 1619 Project

    As it relates to my aforementioned post, the same sentiments apply.

    Again, it is inexpressibly hard to explain through a simple discussion post. I must commend The New York Times Magazine for creating such a document that speaks to Blacks and America. To be quite frank I feel both angered and encouraged. I am angered by the fact that America has “prided” itself on being a free country yet their citizens, specifically Black people and other minorities are disproportionally disadvantaged on a daily basis and has continued to be for centuries. This country was literally built on the backs of Black Americans. This may seem absurd to some, but in some aspects Black people are still in bondage and it appears as if we are reverting back in time. I believe modern Black American needs thinkers like W.E.B. Dubois to educate Blacks on how we are being treated. Not all of us are aware. The 1619 Project not only can educate Black people, but all people.

    I am happy that this organization took the time to highlight the historical significance of Black people in America.

    Mariah_Smith
    Participant
    Post count: 4

    c. Healthcare Policy
    In 1996, the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) was passed into law during the Clinton Administration. The law comprises many crucial protections for Americans. It allows those who have lost their jobs to continue their health insurance, regulates healthcare fraud, and provides privacy to medical patients.

    Many are aware of HIPAA because it requires confidentiality when handling health-related information. This was pivotal for healthcare reform because it warrants the use of relevant information while protecting patients’ privacy. The act protects one’s mental health condition, provision of care, and payment for healthcare treatment, to name a few . I firmly believe HIPAA is responsible for the doctor-patient confidentiality we have come to expect.
    The less-known HIPAA regulation relates to health insurance. One is eligible if they have been under a group health plan and applied for individual health insurance within 63 days of coverage loss . This coverage is important because, especially since the outbreak of COVID-19, many Americans are left without coverage after losing their jobs. There is a general consensus among Americans that HIPAA is necessary.
    Another healthcare policy is the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA or Obamacare) which is quite polarizing in America. Signed into law in 2010 by President Obama, the Affordable Care Act was intended to make healthcare more accessible and easier to understand. The law requires providers to charge the same amount to cover those with pre-existing conditions (such as pregnancy). It emphasizes preventative care and allows children to stay on their parents’ health insurance until they are 26 years old. Although seldom talked about, there are additional benefits such as mental health services and breastfeeding support.

    So why would the ACA be so controversial? Aside from a black president signing it into law, some believe it is government overreach because it requires people to buy healthcare. It also uses taxpayer money to provide coverage which is not a popular idea among some Americans. Although the law is flawed in some areas, its unpopularity mainly stems from resentment of America’s healthcare system overall.
    For this reason, I believe the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act was more successful than the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act as both liberals and conservatives alike push for its reform. HIPAA is generally well received. While Obamacare has provided health insurance for over twenty-million people, HIPAA’s regulations will likely remain in place for decades to come.

    Attachments:
    You must be logged in to view attached files.
    Whitney_Williams
    Participant
    Post count: 4

    Question One

    A) Should hospitals and healthcare facilities make a concerted effort to employ ex-prisoners? Why? What might be some of the constraints? Has anyone been successful at such a hiring practice?

    Hospitals and healthcare facilities should make a concentrated effort to employ ex-prisoners to improve the health of communities, give convicted American citizens a second chance, and fill the growing number of jobs in the healthcare industry. In the United States, estimates show that nearly thirty percent of adults have a criminal history, and this number only continues to increase. Within the African American community, these statistics are even more staggering as nearly fifty percent of African American males are arrested by the age of twenty- three. Unfortunately, many American citizens with records and convicted felons have difficulty finding jobs and opportunities in a world where their past is scrutinized in background checks and criticized in society. For example, in the United States, most job applications require citizens to respond to a felony conviction question. This simple question is often a barrier to employment as some companies have a bias against those with criminal records. Until recently, this was the bleak reality for many ex-felons seeking employment. However, the growing number of healthcare jobs and the need for more workers is changing this unfortunate precedent. In 2017 Illinois became one of the first states to allow people with felony convictions to pursue healthcare licenses. This law permitted Illinois to fill essential job vacancies in their health industry while giving some American citizens another chance.

    Although promising, the integration of ex-offenders into the healthcare system comes with some reservations and constraints. The healthcare system cares for the most vulnerable in our society, including the sick and elderly as a result, many states wary of ex-criminals have passed legislation in opposition. Colorado passed a law requiring a licensing board to disqualify ex-offenders with a history of drugs and unlawful sexual behavior. Despite some political and social difficulties, some healthcare systems have successfully hired ex-offenders. For instance, the John Hopkins healthcare system willing hires ex-offenders and does not run background checks until after a conditional offer of employment is made. This encourages more ex-offenders to apply to the John Hopkins healthcare system and allows the system to staff their hospitals. Overall this practice enables the hospital to fill permanent healthcare jobs and gives thousands of American citizens a second chance. In conclusion, hospitals and healthcare systems should make a concentrated effort to employ ex-prisoners for both the success of the healthcare system and Americans seeking a new life after incarceration.

    Whitney_Williams
    Participant
    Post count: 4

    Question Two

    C) The 1619 Project made reference to the Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands (Bureau of Freedmen). What other 2-3 federal healthcare related policies have been enacted by the U.S. government since 1865 to 2010? Which of those policies have been most successful?

    The United States government has enacted several federal healthcare policies from 1865 to 2010 for the benefit of the American people. While I believe the Affordable Care Act is one of the most effective policies to enact this legislation, it consistently receives great media and national attention. Therefore I am going to focus on the Patient Safety and Quality Improvement Act of 2005, and the Health Insurance and Accountability Act of 1996 as both of these pieces of legislation have had a profound impact on the American healthcare system. The Patient Safety and Quality Improvement Act seeks to protect healthcare workers who report unsafe and dangerous conditions. The law also encourages legislators to resort to medical errors while maintaining patient confidentiality. Lastly, the Patient Safety and Quality Improvement Act established the Network of Patient Safety Databases. This Database provides evidence-based resources for providers and other entities, allowing for the analyzes of national and regional statistics. This is especially important for minority communities as this system produces data on people of color that would otherwise go unreported. For example, the Seattle Children’s Hospital leveraged its electronic health record to make drastic improvements in opioid-free surgery and reduced analgesic medication costs. This significant progress was only successful because of the Patient Safety and Quality Improvement Act, which continues to protect American citizens and health workers. For this reason, I believe the Patient Safety and Quality Improvement Act has been most successful as it directly affects how data is organized, reported, and influences our American healthcare system.

    The second piece of legislation, The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996, is also an important healthcare policy. The Healthcare Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 allows American workers to carry healthcare policies from job to job. This legislation also ensures that insurers do not discriminate against policy applicants due to health problems. With the recent coronavirus pandemic, the Healthcare Portability and Accountability Act has become especially important. The CARES Act creates a paper trail for one’s health status throughout their lives, as a direct violation of the HIPAA. As a result, Health and Human Services issued a statement outlining that only family members of a patient are allowed to receive information about the sick patient. Even though the coronavirus has resulted in some leeway, the HIPPA continues to protect patient privacy. In conclusion, the Patient Safety and Quality Improvement Act of 2005 and the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 are two critical pieces of legislation that had a profound impact on the American healthcare system.

    Briana_Paris
    Participant
    Post count: 3

    Should hospitals and healthcare facilities make a concerted effort to employ ex-prisoners? Why? What might be some of the constraints? Has anyone been successful at such a hiring practice?

    Hospitals and healthcare facilities should seek to hire ex-prisoners, especially facilities in Black and Brown communities. Since the 13th Amendment was ratified, Black Americans, especially Black men, have been convicted for crimes as a result of bias legislation from Black Codes, Nixon’s War on Drugs and Clinton’s three strike laws. Black and Brown children have also been tried as adults which lead to excessive sentences (Stevenson, The 1619 Project). Hospitals and healthcare facilities would have to hire ex-prisoners on a case by case bases, however. Human resources at healthcare facilities need to carefully analyze candidates’ criminal records and cases, especially those convicted of murder, rape, and sexual assault, to make sure the rest of their staff and patients are safe. A psychological evaluation by a psychiatrist should also be required. Ex-prisoners have done their time; a mistake one made when they were younger should not define them for the rest of their life.
    Sophie Quinton reported that hospitals such as John Hopkins have hired people with criminal records for low entry-level jobs in food and janitorial services as well as housekeeping, in her 2017 article “Matching Ex-Offenders with Hard-to-Fill Healthcare Jobs.” She noted that entry-level jobs at hospitals are extremely hard to fill and crucial for hospitals to work efficiently; ex-prisoners who filled these positions would work harder and stay with the employer longer compared to a hire without a record. These workers would also be able to get healthcare through their employers, which is consistently denied to African Americans since the smallpox pandemic after the Civil War (Interlandi, The 1619 Project).

    Briana_Paris
    Participant
    Post count: 3

    If one reviews co-morbidities of chronic diseases (hypertension, diabetes, asthma, obesity, etc.) and their associated mortality rates across the 50 United States – to what conclusions can one come? What social-economic determinants are driving those situations?

    According to the CDC, 54% of people living with hypertension are non-Hispanic Black adults, and the heart disease is most prevalent in southern states. The CDC also reported that the majority of people living with diabetes or prediabetes are Native Americans/Alaskan, non-Hispanic Black, and Hispanic adults. This is not surprising as most chronic diseases occur and are worse in poor and ethnic areas (Cook and Peters, Health Disparities in Chronic Diseases: Where the Money Is). Chronic diseases occur in these areas because of the fear and mistrust of the medical system and lack of healthcare insurance.
    From Separate to Equal mentioned early in the video that a lot of African Americans, from musicians to the most educated, feared hospitals because it was a “death sentence.” People would even refuse to get treated in hospitals even for the most extreme cases like gunshot wounds. White medicine is embedded on physical racial differences such as lack of lung and brain capacity and pain levels; doctors today still believe in these biases. Thomas Hamilton enslaved and tortured John Brown to prove that black people had larger sex organs, smaller skulls and thicker skin in the 1820s and 1830s (Villarosa, The 1619 Project). Black and Brown experimentation also continued into the 20th Century in the Tuskegee Syphilis Trials, Puerto Rico Birth Control Trials, and experiments alike.
    Medical care is also extremely expensive, and many African Americans lack health insurance. Since the Civil War, African Americans have been denied healthcare through loopholes in legislation. Law makers have constantly believed that “free assistance of any kind would breed dependence” which still hinders African American coverage under the Affordable Care Act. (Interlandi, The 1619 Project). Black and brown communities hesitate to seek help for their health because of the cost and medical experiments and biases that are still prevalent today.

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 47 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.